10 Tips to Improve Phone Photos

I occasionally run into people who ask me what kind of camera I use, how much it costs (yes, they actually ask that), or comment on how they could take amazing photos if they had a camera as nice as mine! I usually laugh, because it’s not the camera that takes the photo, it’s the person using it. And although my images taken with my Canon 5d Mark iii are much better than when I used a point and shoot camera, that doesn’t mean that you can’t take fabulous photos with something you already own!

Since I can’t follow you around every day, capturing those special moments that may happen (and you can’t afford to hire a photographer on a daily basis) I wanted to draw your attention to a piece of equipment that most of you have already. This device that has become somewhat of a permanent attachment to most of our hands, can actually take some pretty awesome photos as long as you follow a few simple guidelines. Of course you all know what I’m talking about…your smart phone! I currently have the iPhone 6S, and though I will be sharing a few tips that are specific to the iPhone, all smart phones can do just about the same thing (you just need to modify).

#1 Lighting is key! Lighting is very important no matter what equipment you are using. It’s vital that your subject is well lit so the focus is on them. When using a camera on your phone, try to make sure that your subject isn’t back-lit. This means that the sun/source of light should not come from behind your subject. If you want to take a picture of someone in front of the sunset, even if you turn the flash on, your subject will be too dark. Instead, angle your subject so that the light is coming from behind your head-or at least from the side (if it’s a selfie, the light should be in front of you). These pictures show exactly what I mean. The first one, you can see the sunset, but not me. The 2nd is turned just slightly so that the light shows on our faces (excuse our day at the pool attire).

#2 Keep your hand steady! Sadly, a lot of the photos I see on Social Media are blurry. The most common reason for this is that the camera was moved during the process of taking the photo. Try to keep your hand steady when you push that button. Get a kickstand and use the timer if you’re just too heavy handed. The 2nd most common reason for picture blur is that your subject is moving. This is hard to prevent using a phone, but you can try to lessen blur by following your subject with the phone and snapping your picture in the process. It won’t always help it, so chances are, moving kiddos will be blurry. This is an example of what happens when your subject and your camera are moving! 🙂

blurry

#3 Flash is not always your friend! Most of us have cases on our phones which actually makes the flash bounce off of the case and pretty much ruins your image. Other times the flash makes your subject have yellow skin (or very pale skin) and red eyes. As a rule, I tend to not use the flash on my phone unless I’m doing a selfie after dark. Some phones do not have this option, but the iPhone 6 & up do-and it’s fantastic for most dark situations. This was taken on vacation after dinner and it brightened our faces and even showed the lighting around the pool in the background.

flash

#4 Get close to your subject! Using the zoom feature on your phone camera will not always produce the best results. In fact, just don’t do it unless absolutely necessary! It’s almost always better to crop after taking the photo then using the zoom. If you want a photo of an actual person or animal, get up close to them-fill that viewfinder! If you use the zoom feature, chances are high that your image will be grainy and you just won’t like the results. Trust me on this.

img_5251

#5 Edit, don’t filter! The big fad lately is using filters on photos…Don’t do it! A filter is obvious and changes the look of the entire photo. Instead, go into the editing tool and bump up the shadows (if too dark), lower the highlights (if too bright), and play with the saturation and hue of an image until you get it just right. Your image will look great and no one will know that you edited it. If you use a filter, like I did on these, they will know. HAHA!

#6 Angle matters! The angle of your vantage point is important. Do not shoot from the ground up unless you are doing so in an artistic way. Women especially, will not like photos of themselves from this angle. If at all possible, raise yourself slightly above your subject for the most flattering shot. Most young ladies have perfected this angle with the selfie. They have figured out that when you hold the camera up, it gives a more flattering viewpoint. But take care not to hold the phone up too high, as this just makes the subject look awkward. I’ve seen this with selfies the most. Trust me, we don’t want to see the top of your head-we prefer to see your eyes and lovely smile!

selfie

#7 Keep your lens clean! Because we take our phones everywhere (yes, even there), it’s important to keep them clean. This is especially true for the lens of your camera. It’s very easy to get food or dirt on the lens, so I clean mine every few days (when on vacation, I needed to clean it almost daily). You don’t want to find out after it’s too late that a crumb or a fingerprint ruined the photo of your Aunt Betsy doing a hand stand!

#8 Focus on the subject! Your subject is the person or thing that you are photographing. Sometimes your subject is a baby, your pet, or even a mountain. Regardless of your subject, you want it to be the most interesting point of the photo (you want the eyes to go directly to your subject)-so it’s important to make sure that your focus is clear. Some phones are different, but for the iPhone you just need to touch the screen in order to make it focus on a certain part of the image. This also brings up a tool to brighten the image before capturing it. Using Depth of Field in my camera can give that blurry background effect, which puts focus on your subject. The iPhone 7 portrait mode can actually help create this effect-but be careful, as it’s not 100% accurate and can blur out things you want to be clear. But it’s a fun new feature. And your subject does not have to be centered-in fact it’s often best not to center your subject. Can you tell the subject in these images?

 

#9 Be creative! Although there are many rules in photography, it is artwork, so those rules can be broken. Making sure your subject is in focus shouldn’t be a rule that you break, but  changing your perspective to look from the ground up to capture something artistic can rock! Look for repetitive patterns in things, don’t be afraid of empty space, use symmetry, capture small details, play with reflections, and most importantly, have fun!

#10 Put your phone away! This is the best tip I can give you. Though pictures are important, I mean come on, I’m a photographer; living and enjoying life is much more valuable than anything on your phone. That food tastes much better than it looks, so put the phone down, eat the food, and chat with your friend/spouse/child! Enjoy life, my friends. It’s fleeting. With that being said, get off your phone…this blog post is toast! 🙂

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